January 22, 2014

Northwestern University, Chicago Campus, Hughes Auditorium
303 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL, USA

Beverage cans. Jet Engines. Silicon semiconductors. All of these inventions have crystallography, the study of ordered structures, to thank. 100 years ago, the process of X-ray crystallography was discovered, allowing the atomic order of many materials to be determined. Read more…

December 11, 2013

Northwestern University, Chicago Campus, Hughes Auditorium
303 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL, USA

From tennis rackets to sunscreen, from stained glass windows to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. New television displays, cell phones and other digital devices incorporate nanostructured polymer films known as light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs. Read more…

November 12, 2013

Northwestern University, Chicago Campus, Baldwin Auditorium
303 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL, USA

Biology is soft, curvilinear and transient; modern silicon technology is rigid, planar and everlasting.  Electronic systems that eliminate this profound mismatch in properties will lead to new types of devices, capable of integrating non-invasively with the body, providing function over some useful period of time, and then dissolving into surrounding biofluids.

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The world of innovation and ideas has changed and grown with our modern and complex landscape. The once romantic images of a lone innovator or inventor scribbling furiously in a notebook or casually sketching on a cocktail napkin are a thing of the past. Read more…

April 3, 2013

Northwestern University, Chicago Campus, Baldwin Auditorium
303 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL, USA

Abstract: Molecular modeling on computers can provide great benefits to society in a wide range of fields, such as medicine and the production and storage of renewable energy. It is a powerful tool that provides a window into the chemical world that is unparalleled in its ability to visualize the nano- and sub-nano environment. Read more…

March 21, 2013

Lincoln Hall, Northwestern University School of Law
357 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL, USA

Blame for the Great Recession and America’s halting recovery has been attributed to many factors. But according to a new book, a major culprit has gone unnamed: the United States’ decline in the race for global innovation advantage. A complacent and politically polarized America is fated for a slow, painful transition into a “Rust Nation,” they warn, unless our leaders can muster the will to act.

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