Video

Program Q&A: The Case for Including Every(Body)

To watch the full program click here.

To watch the interview click here.

Inclusive practices and promoting diversity have been major challenges in STEM fields. However, people with disabilities are often left out of this important conversation. Complicating this issue are misunderstandings of what it means to be disabled and what barriers limit disabled access in STEM. What strategies can be used to create a smoother transition for people with disabilities as they complete their education and transition into the workforce? What resources can people with disabilities use to help advocate for themselves? To help answer these questions, learn about the experiences of people with disabilities in STEM, and hear about current research join us for a panel discussion with advocates Dr. Maureen Dunne, Helen Rottier, and Dr. Susan Magasi.

Blog Post

A Simple, Tasty Recipe To Prevent Cancer, Heart Disease and Diabetes

Comment by Robert Kriss, C2ST, Editor

Happy New Year to all our readers.  Consider starting the New Year off right with a healthy-eating resolution that’s scientifically backed.  Chocolate, strawberries, (chocolate covered strawberries!), blackberries, blueberries, broccoli, cauliflower, oats, peanuts and tea – simple, tasty treats that can make a big difference in preventing catastrophic diseases.  This article from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) explains how these foods substantially lower your risk of cancer, heart disease and diabetes.  No fads, no highly-processed “health” foods.  You don’t have to suffer eating bland food to stay healthy.  You can enjoy some of the tastiest treats and improve your health at the same time.  There’s solid science to guide your choices.  When you understand the basics of what causes these diseases and how the chemicals in certain foods can prevent them, the case for making theses dietary choices becomes compelling.  Check out “The Dietary Choices That Boost Prevention” to learn more.

Berries contain compounds that are protective against a number of chronic health disorders.© kcline/E+/Getty Images
Video

Interview: The Case for Including Every(Body)

To watch the full program click here.

To watch the Q&A session click here.

Inclusive practices and promoting diversity have been major challenges in STEM fields. However, people with disabilities are often left out of this important conversation. Complicating this issue are misunderstandings of what it means to be disabled and what barriers limit disabled access in STEM.

What strategies can be used to create a smoother transition for people with disabilities as they complete their education and transition into the workforce? What resources can people with disabilities use to help advocate for themselves? To help answer these questions, learn about the experiences of people with disabilities in STEM, and hear about current research join us for a panel discussion with advocates Dr. Maureen Dunne, Helen Rottier, and Dr. Susan Magasi.

With the aim of a more diverse future workforce, C2ST’s Inclusiveness in STEM series focuses on the importance of allies, self-esteem, recognition, and representation to help minorities overcome barriers that may prevent them from entering STEM careers or achieving longer and greater success in these fields. These discussions will advocate for a more inclusive and diverse workforce and will highlight the importance of perception as it relates to achievement in STEM fields.

Video

The Case for Including Every(Body)

To watch the interview click here.

To watch the Q&A session click here.

Inclusive practices and promoting diversity have been major challenges in STEM fields. However, people with disabilities are often left out of this important conversation. Complicating this issue are misunderstandings of what it means to be disabled and what barriers limit disabled access in STEM.

What strategies can be used to create a smoother transition for people with disabilities as they complete their education and transition into the workforce? What resources can people with disabilities use to help advocate for themselves? To help answer these questions, learn about the experiences of people with disabilities in STEM, and hear about current research join us for a panel discussion with advocates Dr. Maureen Dunne, Helen Rottier, and Dr. Susan Magasi.

With the aim of a more diverse future workforce, C2ST’s Inclusiveness in STEM series focuses on the importance of allies, self-esteem, recognition, and representation to help minorities overcome barriers that may prevent them from entering STEM careers or achieving longer and greater success in these fields. These discussions will advocate for a more inclusive and diverse workforce and will highlight the importance of perception as it relates to achievement in STEM fields

Blog Post

Where’s The Beef? High-Tech Hamburger May Be Coming To Your Supermarket

Comment by Robert Kriss, C2ST, Editor

In this article, Chicago-based Institute of Food Technologists (“IFT”) tells us about research and development work underway to produce protein-rich products from plants and animal cells that will taste as good as a burger but will be healthier and more environmentally sustainable.  See what you may be feasting on in the future here.”  IFT is a professional membership association that promotes the development of healthy, safe, and sustainable food products by providing a forum for science of food professionals to share how science and innovation makes food better. In the organization’s own words:  “As a scientific community grounded in purpose, IFT feeds the minds that feed the world.”

Head over to our blog to read other great articles like this!

Blog Post

A Fountain of Youth Is In The Works At The Illinois Institute of Technology

Comment by Robert Kriss, C2ST, Editor

Rong Wang, Professor of Chemistry at Illinois Tech, is working on an ingenious method to extract, electrically stimulate and replace human cells that provide physical support for many parts of the human body, such as the pelvic floor in women, skin and cartilage in knees and hips.  The cells are called fibroblasts.  They produce collagen, a protein that in one form provides flexibility and in another form provides structural support. When we’re young, the fibroblasts produce sufficient collagen to keep our internal organs in place, our skin unwrinkled and our knees and hips moving smoothly and painlessly.  As we age, these cells produce less collagen, which can cause a pelvic floor to collapse, skin to wrinkle and joints to become stiff and painful.  Wang has discovered that electrical stimulation of fibroblasts turns back the clock.  The stimulation causes fibroblasts to produce collagen at levels and proportions found in much younger people.  This discovery opens the door to the development of a biocompatible, cellular fountain of youth using the patient’s own cells.  For more information concerning this potentially game-changing research, click here.

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